8 of the most popular dog breeds and the most common health issues they face

Knowing your dog’s most common health issues is important so that you can be an informed and proactive pet owner.

You might want to choose a breed of dog based on how cute you are, their crushed faces or gold coats, their ability to learn new tricks, or their beautiful personalities, but your research should go beyond these superficial factors.

After all, most purebreds have a variety of health problems for which they are genetically predisposed. Thinking about these long-term issues and how well you can handle them is the best thing you can do for your future pet.

This list of the most popular dog breeds outlines some of the most common health problems they may face. From the laboratory to the dachshund, every dog ​​is different. However, a good pet owner who knows about all of their dog’s ailments will make all the difference in a pet’s life.

Eight of the most popular dog breeds and the most common health problem they face:

Retriever (Labrador and Golden)

Julissa Helmuth / pexels

Cataract – A white or yellow cloudy film that clouds the eye and affects vision, this is due to a genetic or hereditary defect.

Hypothyroidism – Low thyroid activity that slows down the functions of the body, resulting in weight gain, lethargy, and changes in skin or coat.

Flatulence – Larger deep chest breeds like retrievers are prone to flatulence, the build-up of gas, fluid, and food in the stomach, causing the stomach to spin on itself and cut off blood supply to the stomach and spleen. The structure also exerts an overpressure on other organs.

Ear Infections – Labs have drooping ears, which limits the chance for good airflow, which usually helps prevent harboring the bacteria, yeast, or ear mites that cause infection and inflammation.

French Bulldogs / Bulldogs

Martin Dufosset / pexels

Ear Infections – Due to their bruised faces, bulldogs have narrowed ear canals that create a moist environment that breeds and traps bacteria that cause infections.

IBS Problems – The most common reasons the French have sensitive stomachs are food allergies and irritable bowel syndrome, which causes the intestinal lining to become flooded with immune system cells, thickening the lining of the intestines and, in turn, impairing their ability to absorb nutrients appropriately.

Conjunctivitis – This breed of dog is genetically predisposed to eyelid abnormalities that make them prone to conjunctivitis, also known as conjunctivitis. This is the inflammation of the anterior tissues of the eyeball. Not to mention their shorter snouts make bumping into objects and hurting and scratching their eyes much more common. This leads to infection.

Skin Wrinkle Issues – Some breeds of dogs have extra skin and wrinkles that appear naturally due to variations. Fold dermatitis and pyoderma (bacterial skin infection) are caused by trapped moisture and germs that cause skin infections and irritation.

Breathing Problems – They suffer from brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS), an inherited defect that gives them their cute, squashed appearance. However, because of their blocked airways, they are prone to overheating, shortness of breath, and snoring.

German shepherd dog

Igor Ferreira / pexels

Flatulence – Larger deep-chested breeds such as German Shepherds are prone to flatulence, the build-up of gas, fluid, and food in the stomach, causing the stomach to spin on itself, cutting off blood supply to the stomach and spleen. The structure also exerts an overpressure on other organs.

Hip Dysplasia – This is a genetic disorder and skeletal disorder that makes the acetabulum too loose, which results in damage to the femur. It’s quite common in large breeds. However, factors such as excessive growth rate, certain types of exercise, and improper diet and weight can make it worse.

Elbow Dysplasia – This condition causes the elbow to develop abnormally. It is usually genetic and occurs due to overcompensation of the elbow joint, which leads to damage to the cartilage.

Epilepsy – German Shepherds are prone to seizures, a disorder of brain function that causes seizures and convulsions. The most common cause in this breed is idiopathic epilepsy, a genetic disorder.

Hemophilia – This is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by a lack of clotting factor VIII (F8), a protein necessary for blood to clot.

Diabetes – Type 1 and 2 diabetes make it impossible for your pet’s body to efficiently process glucose and turn it into fuel for the body, ultimately leading to high sugar levels.

poodle

Skyler Ewing / pexels

Hip Dysplasia – Hip dysplasia is a genetic disorder that occurs when a poodle’s hip joint becomes weak or the cartilage around it deteriorates.

Epilepsy – Poodles mostly have idiopathic epilepsy, which means the cause is unknown. If both parents pass the recessive gene on to their pups, it will happen. It affects all races – toys, miniature and standard.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy – PRA is an inherited cause of late-onset blindness in dogs caused by a group of degenerative diseases that affect photoreceptor cells in the eyes. It’s the result of a genetic mutation.

Addison’s Disease – Poodles are predisposed to this disease that affects the adrenal cortex and the outer layer of the glands. As a result, the body cannot produce these key hormones. It shows a range of symptoms, making it very difficult to diagnose.

Thyroid Problems – Poodles are prone to hypothyroidism, which is where the body doesn’t make enough thyroid hormones. Hair loss, dull coat, lethargy, obesity, and exercise intolerance are symptoms of a thyroid problem in dogs.

Beagles

Tyler De Sousa / pexels

Allergies – Genetically, beagles are likely to have both seasonal and food-related allergies, often manifesting as skin irritations (dandruff and rashes). The feet, stomach, skin folds and ears are most affected.

Distichiasis – Distichiasis is a common condition in which eyelashes in dogs grow in an unusual area that extends from the edge of the eyelid rather than the eyelid skin. The condition is considered hereditary in certain breeds. It can cause redness, irritation, infection, and pain.

Cherry eye – The medical term for cherry eye is prolapsed nictitating membrane. Essentially, it is when a dog’s third eyelid slips and bulges. Treatment is essential as it can lead to other more serious problems.

Diabetes – Type 1 and 2 diabetes make it impossible for your pet’s body to efficiently process glucose and turn it into fuel for the body, ultimately leading to high sugar levels.

rottweiler

MART PRODUCTION / pexels

Aortic stenosis – This is a type of heart disease that causes narrowing of the heart’s aortic valve. Overcompensation can have a number of damaging effects on the heart, leading to muscle failure and other complications.

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia – Dysplasia is an abnormal growth that can make moving around very painful. With Rottweilers, it can, in severe cases, make a healthy, active dog handicapped.

Entropion – This is an abnormal inward rolling of the eyelids. Larger problems usually occur when the eyelids roll inward until the eyelashes or fur rub against the cornea.

Cruciate ligament tear – A cruciate ligament tear makes the knee joint unstable and leads to lameness. This damage can occur over time and gradually weaken the ligaments from repeated injury or arthritic disease.

Pointer (German Shorthaired Pointer)

Helena Lopes / pexels

Dental Disease – Pointers are more likely to get dental disease than other dogs, although this is a common occurrence. It starts with the formation of plaque, which causes infection of the gums and roots. Your pet can lose teeth and damage their organs – kidneys, liver, heart.

Juvenile Cellulitis – Also known as “puppy strangles,” this condition occurs early and can affect more than one puppy in a litter. It is a skin condition that causes swelling and inflammation of the face and the lymph nodes under the jaw. However, steroid treatment is very effective.

Hypoadrenocorticism – This is also known as Addison’s disease, an endocrine system disorder that occurs in the adrenal gland and causes the body to not make enough of certain hormones. Symptoms include extreme fatigue, weight loss, vomiting, and bloody stools.

Flatulence – Larger deep-chested breeds like Pointers are prone to flatulence, the build-up of gas, fluid, and food in the stomach, causing the stomach to spin on itself, cutting off blood supply to the stomach and spleen. The structure also exerts an overpressure on other organs.

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia – This genetic disorder causes damage to the joints / sockets. It’s quite common in large breeds. This condition causes the bones to develop abnormally, resulting in overcompensation of the joint, resulting in damage to the cartilage.

dachshund

Dominika Roseclay / pexels dachshund

Disc Disease – Back problems in Dachshunds are hereditary and affect up to 20% of this breed. This problem causes back pain, mobility problems and, in more severe cases, paralysis

Patella Dislocation – Essentially, this is a dislocated kneecap that is shifting out of its usual rhythm. The dog will therefore have difficulty supporting the weight and may lead to other injuries.

Hip Dysplasia – This genetic disorder causes damage to the joints / sockets. It’s quite common in large breeds. This condition causes the bones to develop abnormally, resulting in overcompensation of the joint, resulting in damage to the cartilage.

Obesity – Dachshunds are prone to obesity, which can lead to diabetes in this breed. This is partly due to their shorter legs, which can sometimes make it difficult for them to get enough exercise.

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